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3G & 4G Wireless: 10 Ways to Get Better Broadband in Your Rural Home and Business – Part 2

3G & 4G Wireless: 10 Ways to Get Be...

In the first installment of better Wi-Fi(Broadband) series, we demoed switching the channel of your router transmits radio waves over to avoid interference from nearby neighbors on the same channel. Changing the transmission channel is, however, just one way to improve the wireless broadband signal in your home. If you’re struggling with poor mobile broadband, try working through this list of 10 ways to get better wireless signal in your home. We ordered our 10 tried and true techniques from most estimated effectiveness to least estimated effectiveness for the average...
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Better WiFi (Broadband) Series:  Changing Your Router’s Wireless Channel- Part 1

Better WiFi (Broadband) Series: Changin...

If you have nearby neighbors with Wi-Fi, the local airwaves may be congested and, therefore, slow. Users have access to three viable 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi channels: channels 1, 6, and 11. If neighbors all use one channel, congestion is maximized. If neighbors spread out across the three channels, congestion is minimized. While switching channel typically has a subtle effect on speed in normally uncongested rural areas, ensuring that you and your neighbors are not competing directly for limited local bandwidth prevents unnecessary interference where it matters most. We used Mac OS...
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Is Satellite Internet Worth It?

Its sky high (like 22,000 miles high) latency gives satellite Internet a bad rap, but its negative reputation is not always deserved. Without a doubt, satellite Internet is worth its downsides for some, although definitely not all, users. This short guide examines the pros and cons of the controversial rural Internet option to discern who wins and who loses with satellite Internet. CONS Latency: Satellite Internet transmits via geosynchronous satellites that orbit earth at about 22,000 miles above sea level. Travelling 45,000 miles round trip takes time, even for radio...
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Where T1 is Still Fastest: Rural Busines...

First implemented in 1984, T1 technology is now more than thirty year old. In an industry driven by Moore’s Law – i.e. the prediction, by Intel and Fairfield Semiconductor founder Gordon Moore, that advancements in digital electronics will double every year – thirty years is a long, long time. In the eighties, T1 was absolutely revolutionary. A fiber optic or copper T1 line has 24 channels operating at 1.544 Mbps both downlink and uplink, speeds that once set the standard in online transmission. Today, however, T1 is outstripped by newer technologies like mobile...
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What China’s $22b Investment in Rural Br...

The Chinese government pledged more than 140 billion yuan ($22.05 billion) to a series of rural broadband expansion projects. These projects will fill holes in the country’s Swiss cheese-like rural coverage, improve service for rural users who already have coverage, and expand e-commerce. By 2020, the government estimates that these funds will connect an additional 50,000 villages to the country’s mobile broadband networks. If it accomplishes this, 98% of China’s rural population (or about 650 million rural dwellers) will have Internet access. Chinese telecoms...